Mark’s essays for Forbes.com

From time to time I contribute pieces to Forbes based on the posts found here on “Ranking America.”

“Is China Really No. 1?” (21 January 2011)

“The U.S.: No. 1 in Startups, No. 6 in Headgear Exports” (20 December 2010)

“Not Everyone Wants to Live in America” (04 June 2010)

“Where Does All That Oil Go?” (04 May 2010)

“America the Preserver” (22 April 2010)

“Nothing to Fear in Health Care Reform” (22 March 2010)

Hooray for All-the-Wood” (05 March 2010)

“In Praise of the Moderately Free” (13 February 2010)

“Working Woman’s Burden” (11 January 2010)

“We’re No.10!” (15 December 2009)

“On Education, the U.S. Doesn’t Measure Up” (22 October 2009)

“Do We Really Need Newspapers?” (24 September 2009)

“U.S. Health Care Vs. the OECD” (09 September 2009)

“Putting National Health Care in Perspective” (31 July 2009)

“You Are What You Eat (or Drink)” (10 June 2009)

“The Problem With a Barrier at the Border” (04 May 2009)

“Ranking America” (16 March 2009)

  1. JND
    27 April 2010 at 10:28 am

    Re: “U.S. Health Care Vs. the OECD” (09 September 2009)

    I read your articles in Forbes on health care and agree with you. I lived for 7 years as an adult in England and France and experienced their health care systems. They are certainly far from perfect, but they provided excellent basic health care for everyone. In England and France everyone follows the same plan and program from pre-natal care to death. In England you go to your local clinic. In France health care from conception to adulthood is proscibed in a single plan that all mothers and chldren follow (our son was born in France). By contrast, in the United States we have hundreds or thousands of different plans and programs, and for those without insurance, there is no program to follow.

    Health care isn’t free – I paid health insurance from my earnings just as I do now. However the cost was much lower than in this country because they were controlled by the government. Those that can afford health care in the U.S. have great health care, but it is costing us dearly – for my family of four, health insurance costs $18,000 per year, or about $9.00 per hour of work.

    Unfortunately I think Americans don’t believe that health care is less expensive in other countries or that the quality (as measured in real outcomes) is better anywhere else. This is reinforced on a regular basis by politicians and others who regularly state that the United States has the best health care in the world. I see this ridiculous claim perhaps once a week in news reports.

    This is a conservative country with a great distrust of government and a strong belief in the hand of the free market. Unfortunately the free market for health care has resulted in us paying close to double what is paid in other countries and in many residents not being covered because they can’t afford it or are too risky to insure.

    I am not optimistic this situation will change much in the next generation. Perhaps in another 20-years when the cost of health care is 30%, 40% or 50% of our GDP?

  2. Mark
    27 April 2010 at 10:35 am

    Thanks for the comments, John. I appreciate hearing about your personal experiences under three different health care systems. You’re right, no place is perfect, but the U.S. health care system really does lag behind many other countries.

  3. Halley
    6 November 2011 at 1:21 am

    I read your articles in Forbes on health care and agree with you. I lived for 7 years as an adult in England and France and experienced their health care systems. They are certainly far from perfect, but they provided excellent basic health care for everyone. In England and France everyone follows the same plan and program from pre-natal care to death. In England you go to your local clinic. In France health care from conception to adulthood is proscibed in a single plan that all mothers and chldren follow (our son was born in France). By contrast, in the United States we have hundreds or thousands of different plans and programs, and for those without insurance, there is no program to follow.
    +1

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